Law School hosts conference that explores issues surrounding arctic climate change

Published October 29, 2017

“The full conference on Friday will bring together interdisciplinary experts in multiple fields from around the world who will ask hard questions and seek to understand better changing relations between human societies and the environment, and the policies that should accompany such change.”
Errol Meidinger, Director
Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy

Experts from around the globe gathered in Buffalo to deliberate on international, national, and local perceptions of environmental, cultural, social and economic change in the arctic at the conference “The Big Thaw: Policy, Governance and Climate Change in the Circumpolar North” held on April 18 and 19 in O’Brian Hall at the University at Buffalo’s North Campus.

The three United States legal experts who will speak at the CLE are:

  • Michael B. Gerrard, eminent climate change expert and former president of the American Bar Association’s Section on Energy, Environment and Recourses, who currently serves as the Director of the Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia Law School, will present a timely lecture entitled “Regulating in the face of a changing world: legal remedies for and legal issues faced by communities threatened by climate change.”
  • Internationally-renowned Professor Cinnamon Carlarne, from The Ohio State University Michael E. Moritz College of Law, will lecture on international developments entitled “Global Climate Change Negotiations Then and Now: Adaptation and Diversification in a Warming World.”
  • Mark Roberts, Senior Counsel and International Policy Advisor for the Environmental Investigation Agency will examine the question “Will Action on Short Lived Climate Forcers Give the Arctic Time to Adapt?”

“Climate change is slowly transforming the planet,” observes Professor Kim Diana Connolly. “In 2012, the peer-reviewed Arctic Report Card revealed that new records were set for sea ice extent, terrestrial snow extent and permafrost temperature. Experts agree that the amplified response of the Arctic makes it a high-sensitivity indicator of climate change and a worthy focus for exploration of the future of climate change policy,” says Connolly, who also directs the law school’s Environmental Law Program and is one of the conveners of the conference.

“The full conference will bring together interdisciplinary experts in multiple fields from around the world who will ask hard questions and seek to understand better changing relations between human societies and the environment, and the policies that should accompany such change,” says Professor and Director of the Baldy Center for Law and Social Policy Errol Meidinger, who is also one of the conveners of the conference.

This conference was part of the University at Buffalo’s Earth Week celebration.