Community Justice Clinic

Nicole Hallett (far right), assistant clinical professor and director of the Community Justice Clinic, attending a DACA protest in Buffalo.

The Community Justice Clinic (CJC) represents low-income residents and communities of Buffalo on litigation as well as policy and community education projects.

The clinic takes on both individual cases and “impact” litigation designed to bring about a change in the law. Its policy and community education projects are undertaken on behalf of community organizations and coalitions.

Contact Us

Nicole Hallett, Director of the Community Justice Clinic

University at Buffalo
School of Law
507 O'Brian Hall, North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-1100
716-645-2167
law-cjc@buffalo.edu

The CJC is a four-credit, semester-long course. Students are strongly encouraged, though not required, to enroll in the CJC for  more than one semester. Advanced students have the option of enrolling in the clinic for two or four credits.

Each student is assigned to a litigation project and a policy/community education project. Students can expect to be exposed to many different areas of law and types of lawyering and will have some ability to choose the types of projects they work on based on their interests and experience.

Students work in teams and are responsible for all aspects of their projects. In previous semesters, students have:

  • argued motions in court;
  • attended and presented at community meetings;
  • met with legislators and stakeholders;
  • conducted intakes and client interviews;
  • drafted letters, briefs, complaints, and other legal documents;
  • researched complex legal issues.

The required CJC seminar focuses on lawyering skills, legal ethics, and substantive law. It will also explore how lawyers can support social movements and grassroots organizing.