Dealing with Law School Stress

At the School of Law, students can find a variety of services that will meet their needs.

Below are several resources to help a law student cope with the stress of going to law school.

UB Counseling Services

UB Counseling Services are available to students without charge by experienced psychologists and clinical social workers.  They also have a psychiatrist on call if needed.  They will see a student who “drops in” for a half hour emergency appointment or the student may call for an appointment.

    UB Counseling Services
    120 Richmond Quad (Campus map)
    University at Buffalo (North Campus)
    716-645-2720

Special Sessions on Racialized Violence and Trauma

In the past month, the news has been filled with examples of unarmed black men and women (George Floyd in Minneapolis, Ahmaud Aubrey in Georgia, and Breonna Taylor in Kentucky to name a few) being killed by the police or other citizens.

UB Counseling Services (UBCS) joins the rest of the UB community in expressing our grief, sorrow and compassion to all who have been impacted by the race- based tragedies that have been occurring across our nation. These tragedies reflect a longstanding and entrenched history of structural and systemic injustice that we condemn and are dedicated to addressing. While these tragedies can be traumatizing for all of us, we recognize that they may be especially injurious to members of our Black and African-American community.

In the aftermath of experiencing or witnessing trauma, it is normal to experience a range of feelings and emotions, such as shock, fear, sadness, anger, helplessness or guilt.  As a mental health service, UBCS is committed to affirming and providing care for all of our students who have been directly or vicariously impacted by trauma.  We encourage you to contact our office if you (or someone you know) would like support with coping and healing. UBCS is already offering virtual workshops and therapy groups specific to students of color and international students.  

However, in response to the recent incidents we will be hosting virtual drop-in community listening workshops that focus on recognizing and coping with racialized trauma. Listening Sessions provide an opportunity for the UB community to share how they have been emotionally and psychologically impacted by recent incidents of racialized violence in the U.S. and the subsequent civil unrest that has followed. Ways to identify peaceful action, inclusivity, coping and support will be discussed.

Students, faculty, and staff are welcome to participate.   

Join us here:
https://buffalo.zoom.us/j/98216890909?pwd=TjJpN1l0MDE0bkxWWUFEZHlNbFMwUT09

With compassion and solidarity,

The Staff at UB Counseling Services

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Students of Color Support Group

Mondays 2:30-4:00 - Online
Please contact UB Counseling Services (716-645-2720) to schedule a group screen.

This semi-structured support group is committed to providing an affirming space for Students of Color to reflect on their experiences at a Predominately White Institution. In this group we recognize the unique challenges of Students of Color and aim to foster a community for students to give voice to their experiences, gain support, and develop healthy coping strategies.

Topics explored in this group include but are not limited to: navigating microaggressions, feelings of isolation, imposter syndrome, family/social relationships, and maintaining healthy self-care in the current socio-political climate.

UB Health and Wellness

Law school can be a stressful time. The University's Student Wellness Education Services can provide help with nutritional counseling, smoking cessation, stress reduction and other issues.

Lawyers with Depression Group

Lawyers with Depression is a confidential support group for those struggling with depression in the legal profession, giving lawyers a place to share and find support for their depression while practicing law.

Mental Health Screening

Mental health is a key part of your overall health. Brief screenings are the quickest way to determine if you or someone you care about should connect with a mental health professional - they are a checkup from your neck up.

This program is completely anonymous and confidential and, immediately following the brief questionnaire, you will see your results, recommendations, and key resources.

Lawyers Helping Lawyers Committee

Established by the Erie County Bar Association, the Lawyers Helping Lawyers Committee provides a confidential channel of communication for attorneys and judges experiencing alcohol or drug-related difficulties. Each year the Committee gives a presentation to first-year law students where they talk about depression, substance abuse, and support services available through the Erie County Bar Association’s for students who need help or are in trouble.

Lawyer Assistance Program

The New York State Bar Association’s Lawyer Assistance Program (LAP) provides education and confidential assistance to lawyers, judges, law school students, and immediate family members who are affected by the problem of substance abuse, stress, depression or other mental health issues.  Its goal is to assist in the prevention, early identification, and intervention of problems that can affect professional conduct and quality of life. All LAP services are confidential and protected under Section 499 of the Judiciary Law.

For assistance, call 1-800-255-0569 or contact nysbalap@hushmail.com.

LawLifeline.com

An online service for law students, LawLifeline provides information about a wide range of emotional health issues, such as including anxiety, depression and stress. It also offers an anonymous, confidential web-based resource center allowing students to search for information and learn how to go about seeking help if they need it.

Information on the website covers a wide-range of emotional health topics relevant for law students in their daily lives. In addition, the site features a Self-Evaluator, a confidential mental health screening tool created in collaboration with Duke University to assess the issues for which a student may need to seek help.